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footnote like libronix - example

How Libronix works with footnotes and how Logos 5 does not work

Our students would appreciate it so much if Logos 5 could have this feature present in Libronix

This is how the Libronix Digital Library works with collected items in the clip board

I can collect as many quotes as the Word clipboard permits and when I go to the document(s) where I want to use them they foot note very beautifully .

Introduction: Creation and Chaos 1:1–2

The unit begins with a concern central throughout Genesis 1–11, the creating God and chaos. We commonly translate these two verses as two complete sentences [1]

Genesis is a name taken from the Greek, and signifies “the book of generation or production;” it is properly so called, as containing an account of the origin of all things. There is no other history so old. There is nothing in the most ancient book which exists that contradicts it; while many things recorded by the oldest heathen writers, or to be traced in the customs of different nations, confirm what is related in the book of Genesis. [2]

The passage.—This magnificent chapter is one of the most concise and dramatic sections of the Old Testament. It indeed covers a longer period of time than all of the rest of the Bible, yet with an overview that could only come from the perspective of divine revelation. Some have called it a creation hymn, but this cannot be true, for it is in prose. It shows every evidence of being intended for liturgical use, of being recited in public worship. It was not intended to be dissected by theologians, but to be listened to and proclaimed. It is clear that the [3]

This is how Logos 5 does the same collection unless I do one at a time. No footnote!!! Totally unacceptable for college work. Cannot Logos 5 have this same important feature that the old Libronix does?

Introduction: Creation and Chaos 1:1–2

The unit begins with a concern central throughout Genesis 1–11, the creating God and chaos. We commonly translate these two verses as two complete sentences

(no footnote instead it is entered into the document)

Eugene F. Roop, Genesis, Believers Church Bible Commentary (Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1987), 25.

Genesis is a name taken from the Greek, and signifies “the book of generation or production;” it is properly so called, as containing an account of the origin of all things. There is no other history so old. There is nothing in the most ancient book which exists that contradicts it; while many things recorded by the oldest heathen writers, or to be traced in the customs of different nations, confirm what is related in the book of Genesis.

Matthew Henry and Thomas Scott, Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, 1997), Ge 1:1.

The passage.—This magnificent chapter is one of the most concise and dramatic sections of the Old Testament. It indeed covers a longer period of time than all of the rest of the Bible, yet with an overview that could only come from the perspective of divine revelation. Some have called it a creation hymn, but this cannot be true, for it is in prose. It shows every evidence of being intended for liturgical use, of being recited in public worship. It was not intended to be dissected by theologians, but to be listened to and proclaimed. It is clear that the

The Teacher's Bible Commentary, ed. Franklin H. Paschall and Herschel H. Hobbs (Nashville: Broadman and Holman Publishers, 1972), 12.

See below how Libronix - puts the footnotes in automatically from the clipboard - no matter how many items were collected while reading - Logos will only do this for one note at at time.
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[1]Roop, E. F. (1987). Genesis. Believers church Bible commentary (25). Scottdale, Pa.: Herald Press.

[2]Henry, M., & Scott, T. (1997). Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary (Ge 1:1). Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems.

[3]Paschall, F. H., & Hobbs, H. H. (1972). The teacher's Bible commentary: A concise, thorough interpretation of the entire Bible designed especially for Sunday School teachers (12). Nashville: Broadman and Holman Publishers.

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